Call me bun

My compassionate, sustainable sushi recipes and worthless pearls of life wisdom for the 21st Century and beyond.
ONIGIRI 

A forerunner of traditional nigiri-style sushi, the onigiri is the way sushi was made thousands of years ago, using ingredients from close by and molded by hand into easy to eat whole grain rice balls. 
DREAMCATCHER ONIGIRI 
Mugwort 3 little balls for 5 
Mugwort, introduced to the new world by the Pilgrims of the Mayflower, is the locally foraged medicinal and invasive herb used in this recipe. Mugwort is believed by indigenous people worldwide to inspire dreams and visions and contains exponentially more nutrients and phytochemicals than any cultivated plant. 
LOCAL SALMON CAVIAR ONIGIRI (AK, US) 2 little balls for 5 
SMOKED WILD COHO SALMON (AK, US) 2 little balls for 5 
MÉNAGE À TROIS ONIGIRI 
All three kinds of onigiri for 7 

ONIGIRI

A forerunner of traditional nigiri-style sushi, the onigiri is the way sushi was made thousands of years ago, using ingredients from close by and molded by hand into easy to eat whole grain rice balls.

DREAMCATCHER ONIGIRI

Mugwort
3 little balls for 5 

Mugwort, introduced to the new world by the Pilgrims of the Mayflower, is the locally foraged medicinal and invasive herb used in this recipe. Mugwort is believed by indigenous people worldwide to inspire dreams and visions and contains exponentially more nutrients and phytochemicals than any cultivated plant.

LOCAL SALMON CAVIAR ONIGIRI (AK, US) 2 little balls for 5 

SMOKED WILD COHO SALMON (AK, US) 2 little balls for 5 

MÉNAGE À TROIS ONIGIRI

All three kinds of onigiri for 7 

THE SOFTEST FRENCH KISSES 

Rediculously sexy, warm scallops in a sake-based ginger garlic oyster sauce  
How To French Kiss a Scallop 
The Softest French Kisses captures the sensual pleasures of French Kissing; it is warm, and it makes you want to gently draw the plump scallops into your mouth with your tongue. 
Freshly shucked East Coast scallops are served in a sake based ginger garlic oyster sauce which we slowly simmer down in a sauce of caramelized local oysters. 
The recommended method of eating this dish is to slowly and sensually rub a warm slice of sultry scallop once around your puckered lips and then, in the final moment, to suck it into your mouth with a popping sound. This popping sound is one that is considered good table and kissing manners in nations where the sensuality index is the highest in the world.

THE SOFTEST FRENCH KISSES

Rediculously sexy, warm scallops in a sake-based ginger garlic oyster sauce 

How To French Kiss a Scallop

The Softest French Kisses captures the sensual pleasures of French Kissing; it is warm, and it makes you want to gently draw the plump scallops into your mouth with your tongue.

Freshly shucked East Coast scallops are served in a sake based ginger garlic oyster sauce which we slowly simmer down in a sauce of caramelized local oysters.

The recommended method of eating this dish is to slowly and sensually rub a warm slice of sultry scallop once around your puckered lips and then, in the final moment, to suck it into your mouth with a popping sound. This popping sound is one that is considered good table and kissing manners in nations where the sensuality index is the highest in the world.

Since affordability is the biggest challenge for the organic and sustainable food movement, our menu is organized in a way where the healthiest recipes are also the most affordable. These are the recipes that I make for my family every day, a rethinking of the traditional Japanese food that we grew up loving. 
Bic Macs cost about five dollars and almost a billion are eaten each year all around the world. Inspired to do the opposite of what the Big Mac achieves, the recipes that are priced at five dollars or less on our menu are also the healthiest ones for our bodies and for the planet. Sustainable seafood and whole, fresh, plant-based ingredients with no additional saturated fats, Omega 6s, preservatives, or lots of salt.

Since affordability is the biggest challenge for the organic and sustainable food movement, our menu is organized in a way where the healthiest recipes are also the most affordable. These are the recipes that I make for my family every day, a rethinking of the traditional Japanese food that we grew up loving.

Bic Macs cost about five dollars and almost a billion are eaten each year all around the world. Inspired to do the opposite of what the Big Mac achieves, the recipes that are priced at five dollars or less on our menu are also the healthiest ones for our bodies and for the planet. Sustainable seafood and whole, fresh, plant-based ingredients with no additional saturated fats, Omega 6s, preservatives, or lots of salt.

Here’s the six and a half week old darling little girl that we just brought home. She loves to cuddle and like her daddy, she loves to butt heads too! I now have two goats and they make me happy in an essential and pure kind of way that only animals, babies, and very old people can.

Here’s the six and a half week old darling little girl that we just brought home. She loves to cuddle and like her daddy, she loves to butt heads too! I now have two goats and they make me happy in an essential and pure kind of way that only animals, babies, and very old people can.

I hope you will join us at the Miya's Farm for an unforgettable dinner adventure!

There are a handful of seats left for our dinner adventure priced at a fraction of what we usually charge for Art’s and Ideas. We will be discussing the history of food and the future of food through sushi. You will learn how to make sushi from thousands of years ago and sustainable sushi for the future too. Today Miya’s is like the Montparnasse of the 1920’s. You will enjoy the inspiring company from a wide breadth of disciplines as much as the cuisine born of New Haven that is influencing the world of sustainability today. The dinner will be hosted by me, my sister Mie-Sara Lai, and New Haven artist Will Reynolds. We hope you will be joining us! 

Today we are experiencing and epidemic of diet related diseases which did not exist during pre-agrarian times.
We don’t know why, specifically, there is a such a strong link between red meat consumption and prostate, colorectal, breast cancers, and type two diabetes. It may have something to do with growth hormones which may encourage tumors and cancers to grow much too quickly as are children are. And, who knows how much of these cancers are related to pesticides too. Or, their link to saturated fats. It’s often a combination of different drivers that increase the risk of certain diseases. And that said, there are strong indications that the antibiotics in our meat is encouraging the the epidemic we are facing in resistant bacteria 
The same issues with red meat seem to be applicable to dairy, and to chicken, turkey, and pork.

And regular alcohol and sugar intake seems to significantly increase cancer and type 2 diabetes risk too. So, it’s best to stay away from any refined carbohydrates or anything with sweeteners added or that turns to sugar quickly like white pasta, white rice, and white bread. 

Eat mostly plant based, 100% whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Eat wild meats and seafood rather than farmed. And eat organic when it needs to be according to EWG’s list of most pesticide laden foods: http://www.ewg.org/foodnews/

And, eat in a way that takes into consideration the impacts that our consumption is having on the rest of the living planet. The ecosystem of our bodies are directly related to and reflective of the ecosystem of the world. So, when we pour billions of pounds of pesticides on our crops, or deca-millions of pounds of antibiotics into the livestock that we over-consume, or support a food system that is speeding up Climate Change, it all come back to us polluting our bodies and disabling us with disease. By hurting the world, we hurt ourselves.

On that note, please pass the chicken wings and ribs please! It sure isn’t easy to be a good boy!

Today we are experiencing and epidemic of diet related diseases which did not exist during pre-agrarian times.

We don’t know why, specifically, there is a such a strong link between red meat consumption and prostate, colorectal, breast cancers, and type two diabetes. It may have something to do with growth hormones which may encourage tumors and cancers to grow much too quickly as are children are. And, who knows how much of these cancers are related to pesticides too. Or, their link to saturated fats. It’s often a combination of different drivers that increase the risk of certain diseases. And that said, there are strong indications that the antibiotics in our meat is encouraging the the epidemic we are facing in resistant bacteria 

The same issues with red meat seem to be applicable to dairy, and to chicken, turkey, and pork.
And regular alcohol and sugar intake seems to significantly increase cancer and type 2 diabetes risk too. So, it’s best to stay away from any refined carbohydrates or anything with sweeteners added or that turns to sugar quickly like white pasta, white rice, and white bread. 
Eat mostly plant based, 100% whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Eat wild meats and seafood rather than farmed. And eat organic when it needs to be according to EWG’s list of most pesticide laden foods: http://www.ewg.org/foodnews/
And, eat in a way that takes into consideration the impacts that our consumption is having on the rest of the living planet. The ecosystem of our bodies are directly related to and reflective of the ecosystem of the world. So, when we pour billions of pounds of pesticides on our crops, or deca-millions of pounds of antibiotics into the livestock that we over-consume, or support a food system that is speeding up Climate Change, it all come back to us polluting our bodies and disabling us with disease. By hurting the world, we hurt ourselves.
On that note, please pass the chicken wings and ribs please! It sure isn’t easy to be a good boy!
Imagine yourself as a little person, the size of a beetle, exploring in this jungle of a over-grown lawn, with your a needle in hand as your spear. Soon, we will come across insects to hunt and to roast at the annual  fertility celebration back at the village. And, look at all the wild vegetables to eat too! Dandelion, bedstraw, violets, purslane, chives, heart shaped sorrel, to name a few!

Imagine yourself as a little person, the size of a beetle, exploring in this jungle of a over-grown lawn, with your a needle in hand as your spear. Soon, we will come across insects to hunt and to roast at the annual  fertility celebration back at the village. And, look at all the wild vegetables to eat too! Dandelion, bedstraw, violets, purslane, chives, heart shaped sorrel, to name a few!

I am very grateful to be a speaker at the three day long Menus of Change conference which is a collaboration between Culinary Institute of America and the Harvard School of Public Health. I am thrilled by the opportunity to be in the same room listening to the most influential people in the world of food today as they discuss and debate Climate Change, issues related to the production and consumption of animals, fruits, and vegetables. From the most cited nutritional scientist in the world to Time Magazine’s most influential chef (the head of recipe development at McDonald’s) to my pal and hero the two times James Beard winning chef and founder of Wholesome Wave Foundation…they are all here today to discuss how we can make the world a better place through the broad spectrum of work that we each do in food.
Making the effort to find common ground with companies like McDonald’s which I am fundamentally philosophically opposed to is valuable. You never get anything done drawing lines in the sand. So, I wondered, what would I would do to make McDonald’s more sustainable if I were the head chef there beholden to investors and with a menu based on beef, the most destructive food in the world? I certainly couldn’t make the sweeping changes that we have at Miya’s, a restaurant that has become internationally celebrated for the integrity and vision of our work, yet scores lower on Yelp than all you can eat sushi restaurants in town. Sustainability has to make economic sense for it to work and creating the menu at Miya’s has been as scary as walking on a wind swept tight rope high up in the sky. By evolving beloved traditional recipes and altogether discarding the bedrock ingredients of conventional sushi - shrimp, tuna, salmon, eel, yellowtail, etc - what Miya’s did is like McDonald’s trying to do business without beef. 
Photo: Chef Michel Nischan and his team at Wholesome Wave Foundation are responsible for making local fruits and vegetables, and seafood accessible to millions of people who could not otherwise afford or have access to it. Chef Peter is a two time James Beard Foundation nominee and is a pioneer in the farm to table movement. I am grateful for the opportunity to be constantly learning from the best. And, I hope with what I have learned I will be able to bring a little goodness to New Haven, and the rest of the world, in our small way at Miya’s.

I am very grateful to be a speaker at the three day long Menus of Change conference which is a collaboration between Culinary Institute of America and the Harvard School of Public Health. I am thrilled by the opportunity to be in the same room listening to the most influential people in the world of food today as they discuss and debate Climate Change, issues related to the production and consumption of animals, fruits, and vegetables. From the most cited nutritional scientist in the world to Time Magazine’s most influential chef (the head of recipe development at McDonald’s) to my pal and hero the two times James Beard winning chef and founder of Wholesome Wave Foundation…they are all here today to discuss how we can make the world a better place through the broad spectrum of work that we each do in food.

Making the effort to find common ground with companies like McDonald’s which I am fundamentally philosophically opposed to is valuable. You never get anything done drawing lines in the sand. So, I wondered, what would I would do to make McDonald’s more sustainable if I were the head chef there beholden to investors and with a menu based on beef, the most destructive food in the world? I certainly couldn’t make the sweeping changes that we have at Miya’s, a restaurant that has become internationally celebrated for the integrity and vision of our work, yet scores lower on Yelp than all you can eat sushi restaurants in town. Sustainability has to make economic sense for it to work and creating the menu at Miya’s has been as scary as walking on a wind swept tight rope high up in the sky. By evolving beloved traditional recipes and altogether discarding the bedrock ingredients of conventional sushi - shrimp, tuna, salmon, eel, yellowtail, etc - what Miya’s did is like McDonald’s trying to do business without beef. 

Photo: Chef Michel Nischan and his team at Wholesome Wave Foundation are responsible for making local fruits and vegetables, and seafood accessible to millions of people who could not otherwise afford or have access to it. Chef Peter is a two time James Beard Foundation nominee and is a pioneer in the farm to table movement. I am grateful for the opportunity to be constantly learning from the best. And, I hope with what I have learned I will be able to bring a little goodness to New Haven, and the rest of the world, in our small way at Miya’s.

There’s no greater honor than having children appreciating what you do. These kids made my day!

There’s no greater honor than having children appreciating what you do. These kids made my day!