Call me bun

My compassionate, sustainable sushi recipes and worthless pearls of life wisdom for the 21st Century and beyond.
There’s no greater honor than having children appreciating what you do. These kids made my day!

There’s no greater honor than having children appreciating what you do. These kids made my day!

Yesterday, my brother Ted and I dropped by the Yale University apartments on Prospect Street where we spent much of our youth. While we were posing for pictures in front of Apartment #51, the young family living there cracked the door open to see what we were up to. We had some of the best times in that little apartment. Once you have enough good food and beer, true happiness isn’t about the stuff you own, or where you live, or how successful you seem to others. It’s about the love of the people around you and having the opportunity to give a little of it back.

Yesterday, my brother Ted and I dropped by the Yale University apartments on Prospect Street where we spent much of our youth. While we were posing for pictures in front of Apartment #51, the young family living there cracked the door open to see what we were up to. We had some of the best times in that little apartment. Once you have enough good food and beer, true happiness isn’t about the stuff you own, or where you live, or how successful you seem to others. It’s about the love of the people around you and having the opportunity to give a little of it back.

Oh boy, Spring has sprung! 

We are on a race for time because ingredients such as ramps and invasive Japanese knotweed can only be foraged for a short amount of time. All the ramps will be gone after the summer sun hits. And, the knotweed will become too tough to eat like mature bamboo. Did you know that edible wild plants are exponentially more nutritious than even store bought organic vegetables and fruits?

Photos:

1) Knotweed is one of the best sources of Resveratrol which is some studies indicate may be a powerful cardioprotectant. 

2) Since the knotweed is growing by a pond, the plants are succulent. 

3) Japanese knotweed peeled and quartered. The conventional thinking among foragers is that the young shoots are only edible. We have found the older and taller ones are too as long as you peel them.

4) Tyler and Chef Luis collect invasive Mugwort that Native Americans believed helped incite dreams and visions.

5) Chef Luis with ramps which will be used to make hundreds of bottles of herb vinegar for our salads.   

6) Tyler with invasive mustard greens. This plant that tastes a lot like Chinese bitter melon does not allow other plants to grow around it. They are a problem in Connecticut where they thrive.

7) Wild ramps washed and ready do be bottles with other wild herbs that we will forage today.

8) Annie is an Ecological Anthropologist too. She bears the gift of a log she inoculated with shiitake mushroom spores.

9) After foraging for ingredients, we sit down for a simple but nourishing meal of a soup and salad. Wild plants are not only tastier but they are exponentially more nutritious than cultivated ones. 

10) In the evening, the following day, we prepare Japanese knotweed sake.

In this clip little Soliel waxes lyrical about eating insects. If you expose children to different ways of eating and being, they will grow up to live without prejudice and help make the world a better place.

Featured Presenters - Menus of Change - The Culinary Institute of America

June 9-11: I’m honored to be speaking at Menus of Change an important collaboration between Harvard School of Public Health and Culinary Institute of America. I hope to see you there so we all can put our heads together to help make a difference through good food! 

The Gourmet Invasivore's Dilemma

I am very honored to be in an article by the award winning writer Rowan Jacobson in this month’s Outside Magazine. The story is about eating invasive species. But it is, also, about wether we can change the way we behave to eat and live in a way that is restorative and regenerative of the environment, rather than destructive of it. 

A long time ago, when I was a young chef, rethinking the cuisine of sushi at Miya’s,  befriended me and became one of my most fervent supporters, in a time when so many people used to glance at my menu and run out the door. 

Today, after working in relative obscurity for decades, as the founder of the Occupy movement David is widely recognized as the most important Anthropologist since Margaret Mead. 

Last night, after dinner at Miya’s, David said something that stoked my fire again. My embers were dimming, recently, because I sometimes get disconcerted in the work that I am doing. David said “criticize in a way by creating something enduring.” So, thanks to David, I am back on track again.

David gave me this incredible old book by Franco Maria Ricci. The book is tremendously inspiring because it tells us that the world is whatever you are bold enough to imagine it to be. And, there is only a fine line between imagination and reality. And, we have the power to diminish this line by how we choose to think and live. Imagination is reality.

I am so grateful to all of my friends and family, who like David, carried me on their shoulders, and allowed me to live in a way where my imagination can rule. Thank you, thank you! 

It was such an honor and an inspiration to be breaking bread with heroes of mine at the 10th Anniversary gala of Yale Sustainable Food Project. Alice Waters, who reminds me of my mother is such a beautiful spirit. Over a decade ago, Alice Waters, along with Yale President Rick Levin, was the force behind the creation of Yale Sustainable Food Project, an idea that many thought was a bad one. Some of the best ideas are not popular in the beginning. Forgive me John Paul Jones for messing up your awesome quote. We have not yet begun to fight!

It was such an honor and an inspiration to be breaking bread with heroes of mine at the 10th Anniversary gala of Yale Sustainable Food Project. Alice Waters, who reminds me of my mother is such a beautiful spirit. Over a decade ago, Alice Waters, along with Yale President Rick Levin, was the force behind the creation of Yale Sustainable Food Project, an idea that many thought was a bad one. Some of the best ideas are not popular in the beginning. Forgive me John Paul Jones for messing up your awesome quote. We have not yet begun to fight!

KWANZAA BANANZAA
A coconut covered roll of Alaskan spot prawns, cantaloupe, burdock root, and cream cheese
2 very soulful pieces for 8

There is no cuisine that is more American than Soul Food. There are no people who are more significant to the creation of American culture (at least the cool stuff) than African Americans. Soul Food is the result of practical and creative adaptation of African eating to the New World. Created from ingredients that black people like to eat the most, all around the world, this recipe tips it’s hat to the Afro American origins of awesomeness.

KWANZAA BANANZAA

A coconut covered roll of Alaskan spot prawns, cantaloupe, burdock root, and cream cheese

2 very soulful pieces for 8

There is no cuisine that is more American than Soul Food. There are no people who are more significant to the creation of American culture (at least the cool stuff) than African Americans. Soul Food is the result of practical and creative adaptation of African eating to the New World. Created from ingredients that black people like to eat the most, all around the world, this recipe tips it’s hat to the Afro American origins of awesomeness.