Call me bun

My compassionate, sustainable sushi recipes and worthless pearls of life wisdom for the 21st Century and beyond.
Save the date: Tuesday February 28th - Free Sustainable Seafood discussion and feast featuring my friend and nationally renown chef William Dissen of Asheville’s Market Place Restaurant.  Chef Dissen is leader in the farm to table movement and a recipient of the prestigious Monterey Bay Aquarium Sustainable Seafood Ambassadorship. This event is EXCLUSIVELY for PROFESSIONAL CHEFS and begins promptly at 2:45PM at Miya’s.  We will be discussing and sharing practical and profitable solutions toward sustainability, particularly in seafood.  All reservations should go to Ben, the educator, Brown benjaminryanbrown@gmail.com or to me directly.  Space is very limited.  Please do not assume that you have a spot without a direct confirmation from Ben or I.
Photo: Sustainable fish farming pioneer Josh Goldman with his own farm raised barramundi http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barramundi
Recently, my friend Kirk and I were given a tour of the Australis barramundi aqua farm in Turner’s Fall Massachusetts.  CEO Josh Goldman and CFO Jonathan Daen gave us the tour.  Josh’s foray into fish farming began decades ago in his college dorm room.  Today, his company produces live fish in their Massachusetts location and frozen fillets in Vietnam. The live fish can be seen in tanks in your local Chinatown.  The frozen fillets are widely available.  We use the frozen fillets in our dish KIRIBATI SASHIMI which is included in the great Grist article by my friend Brendan Smith: http://grist.org/climate-change/2011-05-13-calling-all-artists-the-climate-movement-needs-you/
The environmental impact of open cage fish farming is one of the main reasons Miya’s does not carry farmed salmon. That said, Australis barramundi are raised very differently than salmon typically are in many respects: Larger fish are stocked from tanks into low density nets; the feed contains very little fish derivatives; yet the barramundi have the unique ability to produce flesh that is rich in omega 3s; the area beneath the nets are allowed to restore itself after a farming cycle.  Australis also has a social welfare agenda.  They pay living wages to all of their employees in Vietnam.  We sometimes forget that sustainable oceans are about people too. 

Save the date: Tuesday February 28th - Free Sustainable Seafood discussion and feast featuring my friend and nationally renown chef William Dissen of Asheville’s Market Place Restaurant.  Chef Dissen is leader in the farm to table movement and a recipient of the prestigious Monterey Bay Aquarium Sustainable Seafood Ambassadorship. This event is EXCLUSIVELY for PROFESSIONAL CHEFS and begins promptly at 2:45PM at Miya’s.  We will be discussing and sharing practical and profitable solutions toward sustainability, particularly in seafood.  All reservations should go to Ben, the educator, Brown benjaminryanbrown@gmail.com or to me directly.  Space is very limited.  Please do not assume that you have a spot without a direct confirmation from Ben or I.

Photo: Sustainable fish farming pioneer Josh Goldman with his own farm raised barramundi http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barramundi

Recently, my friend Kirk and I were given a tour of the Australis barramundi aqua farm in Turner’s Fall Massachusetts.  CEO Josh Goldman and CFO Jonathan Daen gave us the tour.  Josh’s foray into fish farming began decades ago in his college dorm room.  Today, his company produces live fish in their Massachusetts location and frozen fillets in Vietnam. The live fish can be seen in tanks in your local Chinatown.  The frozen fillets are widely available.  We use the frozen fillets in our dish KIRIBATI SASHIMI which is included in the great Grist article by my friend Brendan Smith: http://grist.org/climate-change/2011-05-13-calling-all-artists-the-climate-movement-needs-you/

The environmental impact of open cage fish farming is one of the main reasons Miya’s does not carry farmed salmon. That said, Australis barramundi are raised very differently than salmon typically are in many respects: Larger fish are stocked from tanks into low density nets; the feed contains very little fish derivatives; yet the barramundi have the unique ability to produce flesh that is rich in omega 3s; the area beneath the nets are allowed to restore itself after a farming cycle.  Australis also has a social welfare agenda.  They pay living wages to all of their employees in Vietnam.  We sometimes forget that sustainable oceans are about people too. 

  1. bunlai posted this